EOSC 350 · Environmental, Geotechnical, and Exploration Geophysics I

Principles of geophysical survey design, data acquisition, processing and interpretation with emphasis on near-surface problems. Magnetic, seismic reflection/refraction, electromagnetic and ground penetrating radar surveys. Case history analysis of environmental and geotechnical problems. [3-2-0] Prerequisite: One of MATH 200, MATH 253 and third-year standing or higher in Science or Applied Science.

Course Availability & Schedule

Course Webpage

Course Description

Principles of geophysical survey design, data acquisition, processing and interpretation with emphasis on near-surface problems. Magnetic, seismic reflection/refraction, electromagnetic and ground penetrating radar surveys. Case history analysis of environmental and geotechnical problems.

UBC Calendar

For a full listing of course offerings please see the UBC calendar description

Learning Goals

In this course we focus on the following:
1. The role of applied geophysics
(a) Explaining how geophysical work contributes in mineral exploration, geology, water, geotechnical, and related disciplines.
(b) Discussing strengths and weaknesses of some geophysical methods in any given context.
(c) Using a framework to help focus your thinking & learning about new geophysical situations not explicitly encountered in this course.

2. Key concepts include:
(a) how physical properties relate to the geoscience task;
(b) which geophysical surveys are appropriate;
(c) what measurements, or data, are obtained;
(d) how data are manipulated (ie processed) to produce useful information;

3. During the course you will develop skills for using three specific types of geophysical information:
(a) Potential elds (magnetics and/or gravity)
(b) Raypath data (seismic refraction and GPR reflection data)
(c) Electrical induction information (electromagnetics)

4. Increase your ability to work professionally
(a) Contribute to, and benefit from, the work of a team.
(b) Assess how well you have accomplished individual and team-based goals.
(c) Confidently extend your knowledge in the future, based upon foundations established in this course.

5. It is not expected that students who complete EOSC 350 will be "geophysicists". However, you will
(a) Be familiar with some of the commonly used geophysical surveys
(b) Understand the crucial step of relating your applied to physical properties
(c) Be able to make decisions about whether geophysical surveys will help solve your applied problem.
(d) Be able to talk to geophysical contractors about matters of field acquisition, data processing and final interpretation
(e) Be able to meaningfully integrate geophysical information with your other knowledge

Instructors

Doug Oldenburg