Lian Kwong

MSc Oceanography

Ph.D. Candidate

ESB 2013
graduate

My research focuses on using zooplankton size distributions to understand the implications of climate change on fisheries productivity. I'm particularly interested in long term zooplankton time series and how we can use them to validate and compare different modeling and experimental approaches to quantifying zooplankton production. 

EOSC 326

EOSC 442

My research focuses on developing a novel method to estimate active carbon transport in the ocean from the epipelagic zone to the mesopelagic zone using the biomass spectra theory. Specifically, I am looking at the contributions of micronekton to active carbon transport by way of diel vertical migrations in Central North Pacific.

N. Henschke, E.A Pakhomov, L.E Kwong, J.D. Everett, L. Laiolo, A.R. Coghlan, I.M. Suthers. 2019. Large Vertical Migrations of Pyrosoma atlanticum Play an Important Role in Active Carbon Transport. J. Geophys. Res. Biogeosciences 124(5): 1056-1070.

Pakhomov, E.A., Y. Podeswa, B.P.V. Hunt, L.E. Kwong, 2018. Active carbon transport by pelagic decapods in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. ICES J. Mar. Sci. 76(3): 702-717.

Kwong, L.E., E.A. Pakhomov, A.V. Suntsov, M.P. Seli, R.D. Brodeur, L.G. Pahomova, R. Domokos. 2018. An intercomparison of the taxonomic and size composition of tropical macrozooplankton and micronekton collected using three sampling gears. Deep Sea Res. I. 135: 34-45.

Kwong, L.E., E.A. Pakhomov. 2017. Assessment of active vertical carbon transport: new methodology. Scientific Memoirs of the Kazan State University. Natural Sciences Series, 159(3): 492-509.

Kwong, L.E., 2016. A novel approach to estimating active carbon flux using the micronekton biomass spectra. M.Sc. Thesis in Biological Oceanography. The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.